Viking-Age East Anglia

From the middle decades of the 9th century until the Norman Conquest, East Anglia was an integral part of the Viking world which spanned the North Sea basin. Drawing on historical sources, archaeological sites, artefacts and place-names, this lecture explores the evidence for the Viking presence in East Anglia, from the initial campaign of the Great Heathen Army and the martyrdom of King Edmund, to the subsequent settlement and integration under the Danelaw, and the second wave of raids on the region’s towns which took place in the 11th century. More details can be found here.

Viking-Age East Anglia

From the middle decades of the 9th century until the Norman Conquest, East Anglia was an integral part of the Viking world which spanned the North Sea basin. Drawing on historical sources, archaeological sites, artefacts and place-names, this lecture for the Southwold Historical Society explores the evidence for the Viking presence in East Anglia, from the initial campaign of the Great Heathen Army and the martyrdom of King Edmund, to the subsequent settlement and integration under the Danelaw, and the second wave of raids on the region’s towns which took place in the 11th century. More details can be found here.

M.R. James’ East Anglia

Best known as the writer of some of the finest ghost stories ever published, M.R. James was also the foremost medieval scholar of his day and had a strong academic and personal interest in East Anglia’s landscape and history. This lecture for the Royal Archaeological Institute examines James’ East Anglian connections, from his childhood in Suffolk to his involvement with excavations at St Edmund’s abbey in Bury, and looks at the influence which the region had on the development of his ghost stories. More details can be found here.

The Archaeology of Medieval Monasteries

Monasteries were one of the most important and influential features of the medieval landscape. This lecture for the Bedford Architectural, Archaeological and Local History Society examines the monastic landscapes of Britain throughout the Anglo-Saxon and medieval periods. Using examples from within the East Anglian region and from further afield, the history of monasticism in Britain, the development of the monastic cloister and precinct, and the management of monastic estates are explored. Further details from the BAALHS website.

A Portrait of the Artist: J.M.W. Turner in East Anglia

This lecture for the Suffolk Preservation Society examines a series of watercolours Joseph Mallord William Turner made of sites along the East Anglian coast in the 1820s, including views of Orford, Aldeburgh, Dunwich, Lowestoft, Great Yarmouth and Happisburgh. As well as being beautiful paintings in their own right, these images tell us a great deal about the dynamic coastal landscape and illustrate the changing artistic fashions of the early 19th century. More details and booking details via the Suffolk Preservation Society website.

The Archaeology of Medieval Monasteries

Monasteries were one of the most important and influential features of the medieval landscape. This lecture, given as part of the Monastic Heritage in Greensand Country conference organised by the Greensand Country Landscape Partnership examines the monastic landscapes of Britain throughout the Anglo-Saxon and medieval periods. Using examples from within the Greensand region and from further afield, the history of monasticism in Britain, the development of the monastic cloister and precinct, and the management of monastic estates are explored. More details and tickets can be found here.

M.R. James’ East Anglia

Best known as the writer of some of the finest ghost stories ever published, M.R. James was also the foremost medieval scholar of his day and had a strong academic and personal interest in East Anglia’s landscape and history. This lecture for the Southwold Historical Society examines James’ East Anglian connections, from his childhood in Suffolk to his involvement with excavations at St Edmund’s abbey in Bury, and looks at the influence which the region had on the development of his ghost stories. More details can be found here.

‘Bare Ruin’d choirs’: The Archaeology of Medieval Monasteries

Monasteries were one of the most important and influential features of the medieval landscape. This lecture for the South Elmham Local History Group examines the monastic landscapes of Britain throughout the Anglo-Saxon and medieval periods. Using examples from within East Anglia and from further afield, the history of monasticism in Britain, the development of the monastic cloister and precinct, and the management of monastic estates are explored. More details can be found here.

Changing Beliefs: The Archaeology of the East Anglian Conversion

This lecture for the The Hethersett Society examines the conversion of the Anglo-Saxons to Christianity, one of the most significant cultural changes in our nation’s history and it changed the Anglo-Saxon landscape forever. This lecture uses documentary sources and artefacts, cemeteries, settlements and early churches from the region’s rich archaeological record to present an overview of the adoption of Christianity in seventh-century East Anglia.

A Portrait of the Artist: J.M.W. Turner in East Anglia

This lecture for the Aldeburgh and District Local History Society examines a series of watercolours Joseph Mallord William Turner made of sites along the East Anglian coast in the 1820s, including views of Orford, Aldeburgh, Dunwich, Lowestoft, Great Yarmouth and Happisburgh. As well as being beautiful paintings in their own right, these images tell us a great deal about the dynamic coastal landscape and illustrate the changing artistic fashions of the early 19th century. More details can be found here.